SF68® is considered one of the best-characterized probiotic active ingredients for the prevention and treatment of intestinal disorders, having a long history of safe use and proven efficacy.

The original strain (Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415) was isolated in a healthy newborn baby in Sweden in the sixties, and selected for further use thanks to its favorable probiotic characteristics. The pharmacological properties and safety profile of SF68® have been studied extensively and its efficacy confirmed in many double-blind clinical trials.

It has been marketed for some time as hard gelatin capsules in many different markets and is available for distribution under license in several other markets. In Switzerland and Austria, the product has been no. 1 in the IMS class A7F (Antidiarrheal Microorganisms) for many years.

USE

Prevention and treatment of intestinal disorders, such as:

  • Treatment of acute diarrhea
  • Prevention and treatment of diarrhea due to antibiotic therapy
  • Prevention and treatment of travelers’ diarrhea, summer diarrhea and diarrhea due to dietary changes
DRUG PRODUCT FORM

Hard gelatin capsules in glass bottles.

Depending on the market, products are registered as 15, 25 or 30 capsules per bottle.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

SF68® is a registered trademark owned by Cerbios-Pharma SA.

The strain deposit of Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 in the National Collections of Industrial Food and Marine Bacteria in Aberdeen, Scotland, belongs to Cerbios-Pharma SA.

REGULATORY

Market

Status

Trademark

Marketer

Switzerland

Marketed

Bioflorin

Italy

Marketed

Bioflorin

Austria

Marketed

Bioflorin

Pakistan

Marketed

Newflora

RGP

Korea

Marketed

Ventrux

Singapore

Marketed

Ventrux Acido

Mexico

Registered

Available for licensing

Canada

Registered

Available for licensing

Brasil

Under registration

Literature

For more information see: 

  • Holzapfel, W., A. Arini, M. Aeschbacher, R. Coppolecchia and B. Pot. 2018. Enterococcus faecium SF68 as a model for efficacy and safety evaluation of pharmaceutical probiotics. Beneficial Microbes 9(3): 375-388.